Dental Implants Information

Modern dental implants are precision devices, available in several different designs to address your specific needs. The most common type is a titanium screw that is anchored into the jawbone where it serves as post for a custom-made tooth crown. Once the crown is in place, you may not be able to tell it apart from your natural teeth.

dental implants 1 Dental Implants Information

  • Dental implants let you eat the foods you love.
  • Dental Implants are the only proven way to prevent bone loss after the loss of natural teeth.
  • Research shows that implant-supported prostheses increase patient comfort.
  • 70% of the U.S. population is missing at least one tooth.
  • Many social functions involve food and eating.

Single Tooth Replacement
A single implant may be used to replace almost any missing tooth, provided there is adequate bone at the site. If not, modern procedures can usually be performed to regenerate enough bone to safely place an implant.

The implant is placed in the bone below the gum tissue. A temporary abutment may be placed on the implant until the healing phase is complete. A cosmetic temporary crown can often be made to fill the missing space.

After healing, the abutment is attached to the implant. It will hold a custom-made crown that the dental laboratory will mold and match to your existing teeth.

In the final step, the custom crown is cemented onto the abutment. The tooth has been replaced without disturbing the healthy teeth next to it and bone loss has been eliminated.

Multiple tooth replacement
Implants can also be used to replace several teeth, eliminating the need to grind down healthy adjacent teeth to serve as posts for traditional Crown & Bridge therapy.

The implants are placed in the bone below the gum tissue. Like single tooth replacement, temporary abutments may be placed on the implants until the healing phase is complete.

After healing, the abutments are attached to the implants. They will hold a custom-made bridge that the dental laboratory will mold and match to your existing teeth.

In the final step, the custom bridge is cemented onto the abutments. The teeth have been replaced without disturbing the healthy teeth next to them, and bone loss has been halted.

Implant-supported prosthesis (removable)
If all your lower teeth are missing, four or five implants may be used to support a lower denture replacing twelve to fourteen teeth.

If all your upper teeth are missing, six or more implants may be used to support an upper denture replacing twelve to fourteen teeth

The implants are positioned just below the gum tissue and given time to fuse with the bone. Temporary abutments may be placed on the implants until the healing phase is complete. Your existing denture can be modified so that it may be worn without disturbing the implants during the healing process.

You will be fitted for attachments or custom-made parts to the implants to support a new denture. Your existing denture may be modified to be worn during this period.

The new denture prosthesis will have attachments which snap into place. Your new teeth are firmly supported by the jaw, stimulating it and halting bone loss. You will be able to remove the denture easily for cleaning.

Implant-supported prosthesis (fixed-detachable)
If all your lower teeth are missing, four or five implants may be used to support a lower denture replacing twelve to fourteen teeth.

If all your upper teeth are missing, six or more implants may be used to support an upper denture replacing twelve to fourteen teeth

The implants are positioned just below the gum tissue and given time to fuse with the bone. Temporary abutments may be placed on the implants until the healing phase is complete. Your existing denture can be modified so that it may be worn without disturbing the implants during the healing process.

You will be fitted for attachments or custom-made parts to the implants to support a new denture. Your existing denture may be modified to be worn during this period.

The new denture prosthesis will have attachments which screw into place. Your new teeth are firmly supported by the jaw, stimulating it and halting bone loss. Your dentist will be able to remove the denture when necessary for cleaning and maintenance.

.Implant-supported porcelain to metal prosthesis (fixed)
If all your lower or upper teeth are missing, a permanent bridge or multiple permanent bridges may be attached directly to the implants. The number of implants and bridges is determined by the specific requirements of each case.

The implants are positioned just below the gum tissue and given time to fuse with the bone. Temporary abutments may be placed on the implants until the healing phase is complete. Your existing denture may be modified so that it can be worn without disturbing the implants during the healing process.

You will be fitted for custom bridges that screws directly into the implants. The screw holes will be covered after insertion.

Your new teeth are firmly supported by the jaw, stimulating it and halting bone loss. Depending on each tailored case, the dentist may be able to remove the prosthesis when necessary for cleaning and maintenance.

(Mini) Implant-stabilized denture
If all your lower teeth are missing, two to four implants or four to six mini-implants may be used to stabilize a lower denture.

The implants are positioned just below the gum tissue and given time to fuse with the bone. Temporary abutments may be placed on the implants until the healing phase is complete. Your existing denture may be modified so that it can be worn without disturbing the implants during the healing process.

Dental implants can provide stability to your existing loose denture.
After healing, ball-top posts are attached to the implants. Your old denture may be modified to hold clips that snap over the ball-tops, or a new denture with clips will be made.

The denture is snapped into place, where it is retained by the implants and supported by the soft tissue. You simply snap the denture out each night for cleaning.

Frequently Asked Questions
Q: Is the implant placement painful?
A: No, it is usually done under local anesthesia. Most procedures can be done in your dentist’s office.

Q: How much pain will I feel after implant placement?
A: The discomfort you may feel should be minor. Your dentist may prescribe medication to alleviate any pain you may have.

Q: How long does it take to place dental implants?
A: Usually 30-60 minutes, depending on the location and the number of implants.

Q: What can I eat after having an implant placed?
A: Your dentist will outline a diet for the next few days including some soft foods.

Q: How long does placement, healing and construction of the replacement teeth take?
A: The entire process usually takes from 3 to 9 months, depending on your treatment plan.

Q: How do I care for my implant?
A: Home care for your implants consists of brushing and flossing. Regular dental visits are required for long-term health and success.

Q: How long does an implant last?
A: If your body accepts the implant, it should last many years if cared for properly. Many implants have been in place for more than 40 years.

Q: If my body rejects an implant, what happens?
A: The implant is removed and the site is allowed to heal. Another implant can usually be placed after healing.

Q: Are dental implants covered by insurance?
A: Like most elective procedures, dental implants are not covered by most dental insurance plans. However, your dentist may offer payment plan options.

To learn more about our dentistry services or to schedule an appointment, please call 415.685.0011.